Mylan’s EpiPen Recall in the United States

Many of our patients have been prescribed epinephrine in case of a rare anaphylactic reaction to their allergy drops, so I wanted to pass along some information about a voluntary recall of Mylan’s popular brands of epinephrine: EpiPen 2-Pak® and EpiPen Jr 2-Pak®.
If you or someone you know were prescribed one of these medications, please click on the link below for more information about the lot numbers of the recalled products and for replacement information.   If your lot number matches one of the recalled products, you will need to contact Stericycle at 877-650-3494. If not, your EpiPen product is not affected by the recall and there is no further action necessary.
EpiPen Recall

Autism Spectrum Disorders and Food Allergies

In honor of the upcoming World Autism Awareness Day on April 2, I wanted to share some information regarding autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and food allergies.

 

General Information:

IgE-mediated allergic diseases (e.g., allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, atopic asthma and food allergy) are among the most common chronic conditions worldwide, and are continuing to rise each year.  In addition to easily recognized symptoms, such as a runny nose, itchy eyes, sneezing and coughing, allergic diseases can cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity, in otherwise healthy individuals. This is also likely to occur in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Moreover, the discomfort and pain associated with allergic diseases could aggravate behavioral symptoms in ASD children. [1]  This may be due the child’s inability to communicate or fully understand or explain his or her discomfort.

 

Allergy Testing:

Autism spectrum disorder children are known to suffer from additional issues, with gastrointestinal (GI) and sleep disorders being the most common. It may be useful to test for food allergies to confirm or rule out allergies as a cause for GI issues.  Allergy testing can be done by skin testing or blood work.  Many times these tests indicate that children do, in fact, have true allergic responses to foods. Other times, the tests come back “negative” for food allergies.

 

Allergy Treatment:

If a patient tests positive for food allergies, they can be treated with sublingual immunotherapy (allergy drops), by avoiding the allergy-inducing foods altogether, or a combination of both.

 

For more information about World Autism Awareness Day, please go to: https://www.autismspeaks.org/.  Wear blue on April 2 to show your support of the Light It Up Blue national campaign.

 

[1] http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/721702_1

Peanuts and Your Baby: How to Introduce the Two [video]

untitledWhen and how to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

New guidelines from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology on how to approach this topic without going ‘nuts.’

Read the full press release

Source: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

How Parents Harnessed the Power of Social Media to Challenge EpiPen Prices

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A few vocal parents harnessed the power of Facebook and Twitter to pressure pharmaceutical firm Mylan to lower its price on EpiPens, a life-saving injection for people with severe allergic reactions.

Source: How Parents Harnessed the Power of Social Media to Challenge EpiPen Prices – The New York Times